2008/9 + 2015 – Lal Lal (Victoria) – Lead, Hardness

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Lal Lal  (Victoria) Lead

9 October 2015: (28 days) Lal Lal customer tap (Ballarat system) Lead – 0.27 mg/L Lal Lal reticulation. (Ballarat system)

An elevated lead result was detected in a routine sample taken at a single connection in the locality. Residence was unoccupied with no water use at the time of sampling. A range of follow up investigational samples were taken including first flush standing water. No obvious signs of corrosion or old lead fittings were identified. A number of service components including the meter and connector elbow replaced as a precaution. No further elevated lead detections at the address or surrounding locations were identified. Informed DHHS of investigations, corrective actions and sample results.

Lead Australian Drinking Water Guideline 0.01mg/L

“… Lead can be present in drinking water as a result of dissolution from natural sources, or from household plumbing systems containing lead. These may include lead in pipes, or in solder used to seal joints. The amount of lead dissolved will depend on a number of factors including pH, water hardness and the standing time of the water.

Lead is the most common of the heavy metals and is mined widely throughout the world. It is used in the production of lead acid batteries, solder, alloys, cable sheathing, paint pigments, rust inhibitors, ammunition, glazes and plastic stabilisers. The organo-lead compounds tetramethyl and tetraethyl lead are used extensively as anti-knock and lubricating compounds in gasoline…ADWG 2011

Lal Lal – Victoria – Hardness

2008/09: Lal Lal (Victoria) – Hardness 280mg/L (Highest Detection Only)

GUIDELINE

“To minimise undesirable build‑up of scale in hot water systems, total hardness (as calcium
carbonate) in drinking water should not exceed 200 mg/L.

Hard water requires more soap than soft water to obtain a lather. It can also cause scale to form on hot water pipes and fittings. Hardness is caused primarily by the presence of calcium and magnesium ions, although other cations such as strontium, iron, manganese and barium can also contribute.”

Australian Drinking Water Guidelines 2011